Airwar over Denmark

Airwar over Denmark

 By Søren C. Flensted

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Hampden I AE301 crashed in the Limfjorden near Hals on 27/8-1941.


The aircraft was operated by RAF 106 Sqn. Bomber Command and was coded OF-M *
T/o 22:00 Coningsby OP:Gardening western part of the Baltic.


While minelaying, Hampden AE301 flying at approx. 70-100 meters altitude, got too close to Hals, and Flakzug Hals (H. A. A. 509) opend fire with its 2 cm. guns. It fired 51 shots and at 02:07 hours AE301 crashed into the Limfjord 650 meters south west of the Flakzug. It fell in 2,5 meters of water.

F/S N.T. Powell, badly wounded, was rescued and taken to the German Feltlazarett in Aalborg. From there he was sent to Dulag Luft near Frankfurt and on to Stalag VIII Fallingbostel. When the war came to an end he was found in 357 Fallingbostel.

Also on 27/8 the body of Pilot F/O Michael J.C. Harwood DFC was brought ashore. On 28/8 the body of W/Op-Air Gnr. F/S William A. Oastler MID was found. Both were taken to Frederikshavn, and laid to rest in Frederikshavn cemetery on 30/8 1941.
On 7/9 the body of Observer F/S Noel Lusher was found in the sea near Hals Barre and laid to rest in Frederikshavn cemetery on 8/9 1941.

The Germans were able to retrieve a number of items from the aircraft wreck: Radio code books, signal codes, log book and maps as well as a 325 kg mine with an attached parachute. The type of detonator was unknown to the Germans and the mine was taken to Kiel for examination. The wreckage of the Hampden was brought to Fliegerhorst Aalborg See.

 

The aircraft at Aalborg See.

 

 

 

 

 

* The aircraft had been transferred to 106 Sqn from 97 Sqn on the very same day or the day before. Thus the aircraft code had not yet been changed.

Sources: AD, LBUK, BCL, OLCB, WD, ORB 97 & 106 Sqn, Martin Gleeson.
 

 

 

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