Airwar over Denmark

Airwar over Denmark

 By Søren C. Flensted

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FW 190A-2 serial number 2208 emergency landed near Bindslev 15/9 1942.


The aircraft belonged to 10./ JG 5 and was coded Weisse 3
T/o Frederikshavn. Op: Heimat.


The FW 190 was seen over Sdr. Bindslev at 12:20 hours when Staffelkapitän Oberleutnant Herbert Huppertz dropped the aircrafts canopy that fell in the fields of Farmer Gunner Sørensen, Aasen.
About three minutes later Huppertz made an emergency belly landing in a field belonging to Farmer Søren Sørensen of St. Mogensbæk farm due to engine failure.

It touched down in a turnips field and skidded on to the next field where the aircraft came to a halt.
Huppertz had damaged his left leg and was bleeding from wounds on his head and was found to be unconscious when Søren Sørensen along with his employees ran over to the aircraft.
The flyers left leg was stuck in the cockpit but they managed to free him and brought him to the farmhouse and called for Doctor Greisen of Bindslev.
Greisen arrived and dressed the wounds of the flyer who had now regained consciousness. It appeared that Huppertz also suffered from concussion.

The Wehrmacht in Frederikshavn was called and at 13:30 hours a party arrived with an ambulance and took Huppertz to the German hospital in Frederikshavn.
A number of soldiers from the German garrison in Sindal arrived to guard the FW 190 and billeted at St. Mogensbæk farm.
When darkness fell one soldier was guarding the aircraft and when Jens Sørensen walked over towards him with a warm cup of coffee, he became nervous and warning shots were fired. Only when his comrades joined him from the house did he calm down.

It took several days to dismantle and remove the aircraft that was 30% damaged.



Sources: RL 2 III/763+1183, AS 51-175, LBUK.

 

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